sus·tain·a·bil·i·ty
  noun
   the ability for a biological system to remain diverse and productive indefinitely

Wilderland strives to be an example of a more sustainable approach to living. We achieve this collectively through minimising our ecological footprint in a number of ways. Together we create an immersive space in which these ideas are shared between all participants.

Local Food Initiatives

Growing our own food is central to our commitment to sustainability.

Wilderland supports the local food movement. Where possible participants are sustained by food produced from our land. We are able to provide almost all of our own fruit and vegetables, as well as some nuts and seeds. Our project is also sustained financially through selling excess produce to the local community through our roadside stall and local markets.

Organic agriculture

Wilderland is a 100% organic farm since its inception in 1964.

Promoting methods of organic farming is one of our highest priorities. Farming accounts for humanity’s greatest use of land. It is our belief that organic farming is an integral expression of care and guardianship over our environment; both inner and outer.

Wilderland farm uses no synthetic fertilisers, pesticides or herbicides. Our long term vision integrates organic gardening and orcharding with holistic land management practises including Food-Forestry and Permaculture Principles.

We are actively moving away from our dependance on fossil-fueled farming practices.

Renewable Energy

Residential houses for long-term volunteers are all powered by low-voltage solar power (Photovoltaics). Photovoltaic systems are one of the most accessible and practical forms of renewable energy we can use. The Hall (our main shared space) is powered by solar energy to minimise our reliance on grid-based electrical systems and on electrical appliances. This helps create a space which promotes greater intimacy and connection between people; as well as encouraging low-impact living.

Native Bush Regeneration

From the late 1800s to the early 1900s settlers arriving in New Zealand facilitated large-scale burning of native bush land to make way for sheep & cattle farming.

Wilderland is committed to ongoing regeneration of our native bush, in order to build balance and resilience for the land and surrounding areas as a whole.

Following the devastating bush fire in January 2017 we have planted nearly 4000 new trees, to kick-start revegetation of native bush in burnt areas.